See Tickets & Ticket Web. It's now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline's a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one. Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. 'There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It's impossible to deny it. And I'm sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don't want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.' Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There's been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is 'almost thoughtless'. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. 'I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I've learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.' Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. 'When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me as a silly little girl. Now I'm confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.' She laughs. 'I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I'm still fucking smart so don't mess with me. Don't ever under-estimate this girl.' Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

"/>
EAT YOUR OWN EARS EYOE PRESENTS   

Kate Nash

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVXYZ ()
SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.



Kate Nash

Kate Nash

SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.



Kate Nash

Kate Nash

SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.



Kate Nash

Kate Nash

SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.



Kate Nash

Kate Nash

SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.



Kate Nash

Kate Nash

SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.



Kate Nash

Kate Nash

SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.



Kate Nash

Kate Nash

SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.



Kate Nash

Kate Nash

SPECIAL GUESTS
100 Club
Wednesday 1 May 2013
Sold Out

GENERAL ON SALE IS 9AM FRI 18TH JAN

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.

It’s now seven years since Kate released her first single, Caroline’s a Victim. Her childhood growing up on Harrow, north London, seems a distant dream. Still only 25, she is already a veteran pop star. She was a MySpace phenomenon before she even had a record deal. Such was the excitement about her debut album that Made of Bricks was released two months ahead of schedule. It went straight to number one.

Kate has always been wise beyond her years. An old head on young shoulders. And here she is, on the eve of the release of her third album, Girl Talk, worrying about the future of women in rock. She still feels that, despite the emergence of artists such as Lady Gaga and Adele, the world of music is dominated by men. And she is fed up of being told by journalists that everything has changed. ‘There remains a huge gender gap in the music industry. It’s impossible to deny it. And I’m sick of sitting around moaning about it. I don’t want to talk about sexism, I want to fight it.’

Girl Talk is a bold, passionate and personal album. There’s been a romantic break-up in her life (which she would rather not talk about) and some challenging times with girlfriends. If My Best Friend Is You was about trust, honest, sexism and growing up, then Girl Talk is ‘almost thoughtless’. By which Kate means instinctive. An immediate reaction to the world around her. ‘I wrote songs really quickly. They are ballsy. You can hear the anger. I’ve learned a lot about people. I used to be really naive and trust people too much. Not any more.’

Kate Nash is proving to be something of a Renaissance woman. She is singing, writing for both herself and Smith, acting, running the Music Club. She performed at London Fashion Week and cites Joan Jett, Karen O and Courtney Love as style icons. She says, definitively, that music should be fun. On the other hand, she says Girl Talk is a call to arms. ‘When I was in my late teens I felt insecure about being girlie and feminine because people would judge me

as a silly little girl. Now I’m confident enough in myself to be able to celebrate those aspects of my personality.’

She laughs. ‘I can look sweet and cute and talk about fashion and make up. But I’m still fucking smart so don’t mess with me. Don’t ever under-estimate this girl.’

Tickets Available through See Tickets & Ticket Web.







×We use cookies to provide you with the best website experience. If you continue without changing your settings, we'll assume you are happy to receive cookies on the website. You can change your settings at any time here.