No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct."
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, 'Too Beautiful to Work' buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout "Tiny Head" to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas' smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here

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EAT YOUR OWN EARS EYOE PRESENTS   

THE DODOS

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVXYZ ()
LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here



THE DODOS

THE DODOS

LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here



THE DODOS

THE DODOS

LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here



THE DODOS

THE DODOS

LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here



THE DODOS

THE DODOS

LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here



THE DODOS

THE DODOS

LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here



THE DODOS

THE DODOS

LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here



THE DODOS

THE DODOS

LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here



THE DODOS

THE DODOS

LUYAS
Scala
Thursday 19 May 2011

£12.50 ADVANCE
WWW.DODOSMUSIC.NET, WWW.WICHITA-RECORDINGS.COM

THE DODOS return to London after the release of their new album, No Colour due out in March. Their wildly percussive style is still centred around the two key elements of punchy rhythm courtesy of Logan Kroeber and the Fahey-infused finger-picking of frontman Meric Long. Last year’s major addition to the dodos’ creative core: Keaton Snyder, a 21-year-old music school dropout who plays a mean vibraphone completes the harmonic picture.

No Colour will be released on 14th March and was recorded with John Askew who produced the band’s first two albums. The tracklisting for the release is as below:
1. Black Night
2. Going Under
3. Good
4. Sleep
5. Don’t Try and Hide It
6. When Will You Go
7. Hunting Season
8. Companions
9. Don’t Stop

THE DODOS are a duo from San Francisco, who throw together a delightful mix of ephemeral psych-folk-pop. Singer and guitarist Meric Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. The propulsive results recall everything from John Fahey to the Akron/Family, and hones the callings of free-spirited, unhinged acts like Animal Collective.

You would be mistaken when listening to their recordings that The Dodos consist of many more members than they actually do. The San Franciscan duo create beautifully orchestrated music, ranging from soft chanting and wistful lyrics, to escalating primal screams and frantic strumming. Visiter, their pioneering debut with ethereal vocals, tribal drumming and urgent guitars, was undoubtedly influenced by Meric’s studies in West African drumming and experimentation with percussion including the inventive ‘tambourine foot’ which involves having a tambourine strapped to your foot.

“San Francisco duo the Dodos matches fleet strumming and picking with steady percussion and select other instrumentation, playing deceptively low-key songs that accrue a modest power like proverbial stones and moss” Time Out New York

No longer does “to go the way of the dodo” denote becoming an obsolete thing of the past. Instead, Meric Long—chief songwriter and guitarist of San Francisco-based duo the Dodos—gives the phrase a fresh new meaning, playing ephemeral psych-folk-pop music. Long’s fleeting, intricate and finely-tuned finger-picking is warm and focused, resonating under his refined lyrical hopscotch and drummer Logan Kroeber’s foot-stomping tom and-tambourine back beat. Last December, the band self-released its sensational full-length, Beware of the Maniacs, which it took on the road this year with Jennifer Gentle and Akron/Family. It’s only a matter of time before the Dodos really get the attention they truly deserve. And it won’t be because they’re extinct.”
Travis Ritter- Willamette Week

LUYAS are four musicians named Jessie Stein, Mathieu Charbonneau, Pietro Amatro and Stefan Schneider. They made a record called Too Beautiful to Work at 6 Nassau in Toronto, Ontario, and call Montreal, Quebec home. The Luyas enlist the help of many friends on Too Beautiful to Work. These friends happen to double as world-class musicians. (We love Canada!) Owen Pallett plays the violin and arranges the strings. Colin Stetson adds saxophone and clarinet. Sarah Neufeld (who plays in a band called Arcade Fire) also plays violin. John Marshman adds some cello, Daniel Tavis Romano plays the bass, Lisa Chisholm brings the bassoon and Leonie Wall plays the flute. Too Beautiful to Work was recorded by Jeff McMurrich, whose fingerprints can be found on fantastic recordings by Tindersticks, Constantines, Owen Pallett and countless others.

A picture-perfect collection of echo-drenched space-age pop songs, their album, ‘Too Beautiful to Work’ buzzes and pops into retro-futurist sonic bliss. From the vintage effects crackling throughout “Tiny Head” to the cerebral repetition found on the title track, the Luyas’ smart, heady pop sounds vital and modern, yet utterly timeless.

Tickets from

www.ticketweb.co.uk

0844 477 1000

www.seetickets.com

0870 264 3333

Follow us on Twitter here

Join us on Facebook here

Visit our Tumblr here







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